Author Archives: Jim Johnson

Transitioning to Digital Radiography: Day 1

Jim Johnson   June 22, 2012   Comments Off on Transitioning to Digital Radiography: Day 1

Phase one of our project is preparation of the room. Our radiography “department” is actually a tiny room about the size of a large broom closet. It barely has enough room for the x-ray table and the chemical processor. The room also houses the clinic’s alarm system, power distribution for the x-ray system, and has a drop-ladder to the clinic’s… Read more »

Transitioning to Digital Radiography

Jim Johnson   June 22, 2012   Comments Off on Transitioning to Digital Radiography

This week we are starting on a project that has been in preparation for a long time: installing a digital radiography system. This system has several advantages over our existing film system, specifically: – Images can be captured and viewed in eight seconds. Previously they had to be developed before viewing, a process taking a couple of minutes. – All… Read more »

Your Aging Pet

Jim Johnson   June 17, 2012   Comments Off on Your Aging Pet

Q) How old does my pet have to be to be considered geriatric? Should I do anything special for my old pet? A) Generally, this is considered to be 7 years – younger with giant breed dogs. After animals reach this age, they need more frequent dental cleanings and an annual assessment. This assessment should include bloodwork, a urinalysis, and… Read more »

My pet caught a bat!

Jim Johnson   June 16, 2012   Comments Off on My pet caught a bat!

Q) What should I do if my pet catches a bat? A) Under normal circumstances, bats are harmless, beneficial animals that should be left alone. However, bats are the most common carrier of rabies in Oregon. If a bat is brought home by your cat or dog, it is best to have it tested for rabies. This service is available… Read more »

Heat Stroke

Jim Johnson   June 16, 2012   Comments Off on Heat Stroke

Q) Is heat stroke a serious threat to my dog? A) Heat stroke can be a serious threat to dogs. Brachiocephalic dogs (short-nosed breeds such as pugs and Boston terriers) are less able to thermoregulate and can more easily overheat. By far the most common situation that causes heat stroke is leaving the dog in a closed car in the… Read more »